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in support today of this rule and h.r. 6156, to grant permanent normal trade relations to russia. . this important legislation is a small step towards a big reward. without it the united states exporters and service providers will continue to lose business to our foreign competitors that have already have trade relations -- relationships with russia. and once we lose those markets, our competitors will only become stronger and better positioned to surpass the u.s. in a critical marketplace of the 21st century global economy. according to the national association of manufacturers, russia imported over $500 billion in goods last year, and of that total only 5% came from u.s. exports. this bill will lift outdated policies and restrict american access to russian markets. as a result studies show u.s. producers can expect to achieve double-digit increases over the next decade in exports of heavy machinery, agricultural machinery, chemicals, and services. this is particularly critical for my home state of illinois where we have fallen behind japan and korea in these export categories.
society, and you look at this map and you look at europe and russia. >> yes. europe is not just a debt crisis. we've been narcissistically focusing on a debt crisis. it's the western extrim city of the super continent and most changes in europe over the mill len ya have come from the east. they've come from the influx of peoples throughout the east. and we thought we had defeated that with the end of the cold war, that russia was out of it. but that's not the case. precisely because this belt of countries from estonia to bull gary are right next door to russia. russia will continue to be a factor in europe's evolution. if you look at russia, it's half the longitudes of the world but it's got less people than ban ga desh. it's been invaded by poles, electricity yanians, swedes. so russia still requires buffer zones in eastern europe and the caucuses. vladimir putin is not the totalitarian eastern giant the western union paints him as. his ne-yo imperialism is a function of his jeep geographical insecurity. poland, here in blue, may emerge as the real pivot state because, again, there's
that russia is worried it stalled on the eastern european economy is going to fail because we can now supplied them with natural gas instead of russia being a bear sole supplier. subsidizing wind and solar makes no sense. also five years ago we fought that china and india and other emerging economies might sign on to emissions reductions. and therefore that if we reduce emissions perhaps global temperatures would be reduced. i don't take a position on whether man-made emissions cause global warming or not but if we are reducing our emissions and china and india which make up 37% of the world's population are not doing so we are not going to have any effect on global temperatures and in the first chapter of the book i talk about geo engineering solutions that no prize-winning scientist paul krugman things can reduce global temperatures if we do it on our own such as breaking clouds with salt water or painting room for white to reflect the sun's rays. what we are doing with the $12 billion we're spending on alternative energy is pushing people into cars they don't want to buy, where raising elec
cheap that chemical manufacturers are attracted back to america. it's so cheap that russia is worried his hold on the eastern european economy is going to fail because we cannot supply them at natural gas in southern russia at the initial supply. in this environment, subsidizing wind and solar makes no sense. also five years ago, we thought china and india and other emerging economies might sign on to emissions reduction and therefore if we reduced emissions, perhaps global temperatures would be reduced. i don't take a position on whether man-made emissions cause global warming are not, but if we are reducing emissions in china and india, which make up 37% of the worlds population are not doing so, we're not going to have any effect on global temperatures. in the first chapter of the book i talk about geoengineering solutions that nobel prize winning scientists paul crookston thinks could reduce global temperatures if we adjust honoring such as spurring water or painting rooms white to reflect the sun rays. what we are doing with the $12 billion they spent on alternative energy is pus
, but you are engaging with countries for whom doing that is much simplerlike china, like russia, the state capital company where, you know, your company is your arm not only of foreign economic policy, but of foreign policy full stop. how do you operate in a world with players who are operating under these very different rules? >> well, it's something we do spend quite a bit of time thinking about this. it's not all about china. there are issues with other countries like -- >> russia? >> -- like russia, but not just those two. and the lines are really blurred in terms of where the state ends and where capital and corporate interests begin for many countries. at the state department, we've really tried to create mechanisms through multilateral institutions like the oecd has come up with a platform for competitive neutrality which looks at the different ways that governments can act to subsidize or to give favor to their own state-owned or state-led interests and provide some recommendations for engaging in a platform of competitive neutrality. it's a different way of thinking about the chal
and russia and they do of mexico. what is going on? >> there was a poll that showed most americans see mexico was a problem. they see mexico, they think of drugs, poverty, corruption. they do not see what mexico has become. security is an issue but they miss many of the other parts, the economic boom over the 20 plus years. >> some 6 million americans owe their jobs to trade relations with mexico. >> exactly. what goes under the radar is how tight the economy as. mexico is our number 2 destination below canada. an estimated 6 million american jobs depend on mexico. if mexico is doing well, so are the u.s. jobs. >> to you think they realize their jobs are dependent on the mexican economy? >> i do not. i think this poll shows the lack of understanding. many people had a negative view. almost as many people said, i do not know. they do not have enough information to say something about the country to the south. part of that is a lack of understanding of how important the economic ties are between the nations. >> most americans think about mexico, when they think about a comment illegal immigrati
. but for the moment, russia's president might be better off putting his feet up and taking it easy for a while. there have been rumors about his health for months. the kremlin has reportedly canceled several foreign trips and anonymous government sources put the blame on mr. putin's babaji back. now those terms -- dodgy back. now those rumors have been confirmed. >> he likes to wrestle. i told him, you cannot do this anymore. what do you want, to do professional wrestling somewhere or what? and he says, well, i just like to drag around on inaccurate he was wrestling -- on a mac. he was wrestling and when he threw him over, he twisted his spine. >> there have been claims that some of his adventures were staged. this is an ally of the president. they have had their moments of closeness as well as their spats. he was an award -- he was awarded a studio just two spots from the highest award of the national federation. it is hoped that the promised game of hot ice hockey does not come even more -- become even more physical. gregg's a now to some research from -- >> and now to some research from an
. revelations 20 about the balance of gog and mahgog g referring to russia that the great bear will attack israel but will have other allies, iran will be one of those. the bible describes there is going to be so much bloodshed that the blood will rice as high as the horse's bridle. many people believe that there is a rapture that jesus will appear in the clouds and that the christians from all over the world will be taken up into the heavens and then there will be a seven year period, at the end of that seven year the battle of armageddon, jesus will come back and he will stand upon the mount of olive, after that the thousand year reign of christ over the earth. we have a live 24 hour camera feed any time day or night people can go on our website, when the end comes, day star will be there. >> some say it is going to happen on this date and this is how. the text is not that detailed. >> most welcome prediction about who will win the balance of good and evil. >> i believe that good is going to win that is not because i'm hopeful, but because history has shown us. >>> no one knows if or how
. the question was about to russia's role in asia pacific. russia was this year's host of apac. it will participate at the east asia summit. it is an important player in the asia-pacific region. both economically and diplomatically. it will continue to be so. >> regarding the president's trip to burma. human-rights leaders expressed concerns that this visit was too fast, too generous. their main concern here is that the administration is far leveraging the opportunity of the first presidential visit which can only be once to press for new reforms. has the administration been able to leverage this a budget -- visit for tangible foreign measures? would you like to be secretary of state? thank you. [laughter] >> thank you for those questions, josh. with respect to burma -- there have been remarkable progress. since we saw the president called them cookers of progress in the summer of 2011. you have seen the release of prisoners, you have seen the easing of the media restrictions, you have seen the infighting into the political process of the parties. we have consulted with stakeho
will be global governance and others is the autocratic regime. i talk a little bit about russia and china as the autocratic regime in the book and i don't see them proportion those countries in the democratic not by force. we could do it or not do it as a policy decision and other radical islam to establish sharia as the constitutional structure so there are different types of political sense. but i'm saying is the philadelphia sovereignty. thank you for your presentation. the was excellent. contrasting subjects and submission that will further weaken the sovereignty or cause us to be submissive some wouldn't even know what you're talking about, 60, 70% probably but you get into the people in this room that probably do know what you're talking about and that get elected in two years and maybe this the department that might understand this is the use of your offer action or something i thought. i am doing that and i can talk about that a little bit. that is a good question. yes, there is a new work in washington and from some of the think tanks that started the sovereignty caucus and. ther
the experts from russia, france, and switzerland join the palestinians in taking specimens of yasser arafat's remains. they're going to study those specimens in their laboratories in their countries. they say it will take three months to get a full result. and then they'll know how he died. now the claims that he was murdered, if he was murdered, he was poisoned, became -- well, you know, for eight years, no one really dealt with the issue until al jazeera tv earlier this year did a documentary reporting that they have confirmed that he died of poisoning of plutonium 210, the same allegedly used to kill a spy turned can dissident. if he was poisoned with with mew tone yum, who did it? if it turns out he was poisoned, they need to find out who did it and that's a whole different investigation. i guess it becomes a criminal investigation as opposed to this kind of medical examination. >> and, martin, who is doing this investigation right now? who is in charge of this decision to exhume his body? >> reporter: well, you know, there was great pressure after that al jazeera documentary on arafat'
from the beginning. i thought he may have voted the same way barack did. he went from labeling russia, which he recently called the soviet union, labeling russia are most significant geopolitical foe -- let me tell you something, he also was opposed to the new start treaty which every single solitary former republican secretary of state, republican national security adviser, republican secretary of defense was for. he was against it. he said he would have never supported it. all of a sudden -- i tell you. it is amazing. we can work with russia, we can be very close with russia. [laughter] he went from harshly criticizing us to saying we will and we will turn over for responsibility to the afghan military at the end of 2014. [applause] he went from saying we should never have set a timetable, he would not do that. i had a debate, too, with ryan. [applause] in my day, he was talking about more troops in the east, more americans would be there -- we should not have set a date. then along comes romney -- my generation has gone on the wings of a snow white dove, preaching -- preaching love
stands on russia and china and iran where he says president obama should have backed the iranian democracy movement and imposed tougher sanctions on iran sooner. >> in my opinion, the president's mistakes on iran are in part responsible for the fact that iran is closer to a nuclear weapon today than it was when he was elected. >> the one word i would use to describe his foreign policy would be tough minded. >> and on august 11th, 2012, in norfolk, virginia, the final piece of the romney campaign falls into place. >> president obama promised to begin to slow the rise of the oceans. and to heal the planet. my promise is to help you and your family. >> with the nomination in hand >> this is not about me. it's not about him. this is about america, the country we love. it's in trouble. it needs our help. >> come november 6th, the american voters will make their decision. >> thank you so much.
't understand about russia, so many spots england. his lack of foreign affairs reality, and the expectation that he would be in charge did hurt him. there are so many things that hurt him. he had gigantic crowds in the end, but it looked like the republican convention. it was just all white people. and he thought with those big crowds, he thought he was going to win. tom brokaw said, i think it's going to be a good day for mitt romney. the american public saw through the lies and saw that mitt romney didn't have a psychic anchor at hunter thompson used to talk about. it was life blazing saddles we're so smart and they're so dumb. they're falling for it. and i'm going to be able to pull this etch-a-sketch on them, and he was wrong. the american people were so much smarter than all of those advertisements. what had he done to become the republican nominee? you look at how rick perry handled himself, newt gringrich all of them. he didn't beat any men of stature. it was embarrassing to watch. >> cenk: yes yes, no question it was a weak division. we got to leave it right there. when we come back
nations. security council members france, china and russia is the idea that by pursuing this vote they will strengthen the hands of the nod democrat palestinian president mahmoud abbas against the more militant hamas which saw its popularity rise in the wake of that recent conflict in gaza. the palestinian officials for their parts mean they are not looking for a fight here. they are simply trying to advance the cause of peace. listen. we are here to reinstate the two state solution and this we will do tomorrow afternoon. >> and that vote will take place around 3:00 p.m. eastern tomorrow afternoon on what the u.n. named several years ago international palestinian solidarity day. shep. >> shepard: jonathan hunt at the united nations death comes all too frequently now in syria. today it was twin bombings in the capital city of damascus. people ran after the first explosion and that's when the killers detonated a second bomb. nearly 50 people died. there is no word on who is behind the attack. it is but the latest in the bloody battle between syria's government and its rebels. rebel
. the u.s. is in third place behind russia and saudi arabia. >>> hostess brands warning it may permanently close some of its plants if union members continue to strike. the action represents 5,000 hostess workers. that is today's david, speed read [buzzer] david: gooo work. hostess doesn't have twinkies anymore, does it? sandra: that doesn't matter. david: thank you, sandy. george lucaas is sell to the film companying to $4 billion this year may save him tens of millions of dollars of capital-gains taxes if he completes the deal before rates go up january 1st. while on a much smaller scale there are many more deals being struck before the clock strikes on a 15% capital gains rate. one of the deals is made by burt wolf whose okay again business was in his family since 1936 but he sold before the higher taxes kicked in. burt joins us now. you're thinking like a billionaire because presumably why george lucas wants to sell, right? >> if you say so. david: why are you selling? what is the specific reason you're selling now? the family has been in business for three or four generations. why sel
, the stans, russia, china, all the countries that have interest in afghanistan. their calculus would be affected by our signing a bilateral agreement. >> so i think it is a very important answer. i have the same feeling. i think islamabad is the first capital that would be affected by the bilateral agreement. tying some elements of the pakistani government to terrorist groups. they are hedging their bets for what happens the day after we leave. if we're not leaving presumably, they lose that argument. but, you know, there is -- every situation is different. i can't help but relate this to iraq. nobody wanted our discussions with the iraqi government for a presence in iraq after our troops left to fail more than iran did. and in fact, they were working on that. the fact that it did fail and we have no continuing presence in iraq i think is part of the reason why iran's influences spread there and so incidentally has al qaeda re- emerged again. i think those are warnings to us about how important it is to do exactly what you have called for, which is to have a good -- much smaller but
, look, we have the leaders of france and britain and china and russia and the u.n. and we're trying to prevent nuclear weapons, you know, you should probably not meddle in this. that's a winnable argument. i think particularly coming out of this -- obama out of a strong election. no one like gaddafi. no one liked libya. no one liked the soviets. it's doable. >> to partially answer the same question. the issue for many in congress is whether this negotiation quote-unquote allows iran to continue enriching at the 3.5% level or not. the historical position of the united states going back to the early 2000's has been that there should be a suspension of all enrichment as a confidence-building measure. from what you're saying, jim, we're well past that point and iran has a lot of truth on the ground in terms of additional centrifuges and they want the -- their so-called right under the nonproliferation treaty to be recognized. the question is at what level do they continue. >> i think there's also -- i agree with that. i want to go on here. there is a debate over countries have the right
. if you go to russia and you put on discovery, it's putin's favorite channel. the people in russia think it is a russian channel so one, our content works really well but it's not just discovery. animal planet also universal, almost 90% of our -- when we develop a show for animal planet we take it everywhere in the world. i.d. as i mentioned has been very successful for us. it's a top ten network in america. in the last nine months we've launched it in over 130 countries. >> "honey boo boo" is not on france. >> tlc is a little different. animal planet, science, discovery, and now i.d., that content works. so we really have a different economic model. if we invest in a show like "gold rush" or we invest in a show with david salmani on animal planet, who will be here in a few minutes or susan lucci we take those shows around the world. those nichz, science is universal. tlc is more difficult. we have to do local content with tlc because it feels like an american channel. >> david is our guest host. we've been asking ceos and business leaders how they are planning for the end of the year wi
where it was just the united states and russia, and now i think we have to drain the swamp. there is no other way, a sane way ahead >> you worry about rogue states, of course. you worry about terrorists. you worry about accidents. have you a movie "countdown to zero" which makes this argument in a really compelling way, and it telling the story of one russian man who actually tried to sell nuclear material to al qaeda. >> yes. >> the vignette of that was rather a low level worker in a uranium plant in the former soviet union, and he knew that by taking -- he could secrete very small amounts of highly enriched uranium, and he had a buyer that was a representative al qaeda, and the whole reason that he wanted to sell that was so that he could get a refrigerator. i mean, for him that was what -- that's all it was to him, a means to, you know, make his personal life a little better. >> queen noor, when you look at this and say you want the u.s. to lead the way and russia to lead the way in reducing nuclear arsenals. the counterargument is wait a minute all the bad actors in the
after a sudden and severe illness. doctors from france, switzerland, and russia are going to take their own samples for independent analysis. authorities said high levels of the substance was found on araphats personal belongings. >> the fire that killed more than 100 textile workers by sabotage according to the bangladesh government. the worst ever industrial fire broke out on saturday and consumed in multistory factor. the interior minister said in a claccording to the investigation the fire was arson. >> coming up on the kron for a morning news we are following a developing story out of san francisco with the axis to and from treasure island on interstate 80 are closed due to a police standoff with an armed man. >> 0ñ@Ñ ♪ secondhand smoke affects everyone's health. it's not just irritating. it can cause heart disease and even death. speak up about secondhand smoke. your health and the health of your family depend on it. welcome back. the time the4:30. we are following a developing story on treasure island with the on demand. we're live at the embarcadero with more. >> good
, specimens of his remains are going to be sent to three labs, separate investigations in russia, switzerland and france where they will be investigating looking for traces of polonium or any other kinds of poison. to answer that question, how did arafat die? because there was never any public report of his medical report. his wife kept it secret. no one knows what really led to his death although they know he had a stroke. that's the issue, how did he die? the suspicion is, he was poisoned. the fingers pointed at israel. now maybe we'll find out. the scientists it will take them about three months before they have their results. israel's convinced they'll find natural causes. sorry. >> i was just saying, you and i remember, you better than anyone, from being there, and i remember covering the funeral, that there had been a lot of talk about arafat's being ill, his weakness, about his leadership, but it really is fascinating that in the intervening years and intervening eight years, the palestinians have divided between hamas and fatah more critically and really is a vacuum of leadership. >>
into three, and each set of investigators from russia, france and switzerland took their 20 samples. they'll be doing separate investigations, and then they correlate the results to the end and we'll see whether they will agree or whether there's any dispute. there's a lot riding on this, of course. >> martin fletcher live in tel aviv. thank you. >>> new allegations involving former elmo puppeteer kevin clash. it tops our look at stories around the "news nation" today. a third lawsuit accuses clash of having sex with an underage boy. the latest accuser said he began a relationship with clash back in 2000. he was 16 years old at the time. a spokes woman for clash says, quote, mr. clash believes this lawsuit has no merit. a fast-moving storm is going across the mid-atlantic today. heavy rain, sleet and snow is hitting several stalts from west virginia to massachusetts. hundreds of car accidents have been reported throughout the region. many schools have closed. the powerball jackpot just got sweeter. the prize for tomorrow's drawing -- it's tomorrow? we have to get a ticket. it's now a reco
authorities launched a murder probe and now experts from france, switzerland and russia will examine arafat's remains, also looking for a possible concentration. the exhumation process will only take a few hours. samples will be independently analyzed in labs in russia, switzerland and france and it is unclear when the first results will be made public. in his lifetime, and even after his death, yasser arafat remains a towering figure for palestinians. but despite wanting to know the circumstances behind his illness, not everyone agrees with the exhumation. i don't support the exhumation process, this man says, because the opening of the grave is disrespectful and insulting. >> i have no objection to exhuming him as long as it is done by professionals and in total respect of the leader. >> reporter: of course i am against it, he says. it is insulting to the martyr and to the palestinian people. the palestinian authority has accused israel of being behind any poisoning of arafat. a claim the israeli government refuses to comment on. it is not clear if pulonium can be traced on his remains ei
that are of concern to the u.s.. when you look at the consequences for russia, i mean this is not just a regional question. it is about the relationship with another superpower with the u.n.. it's interesting, i am sure that a good percentage of the people here, when bush asked to go to war in iraq without a resolution we are very uncomfortable asking without the resolution and yet we find people now saying maybe obama should do it but for different reasons. i think it's a really big problem for the administration. it's not tied to the election. i think the elections and themselves have problems. >> actually a cautious approach example. >> let me say i agree 100%. don't get me wrong. i don't think us going in and invading, either way there are going to be these perceptions along with the perception of the positive images of the west i was helping syria is by no means going to change the perceptions that we help some countries because of resources versus others. i agree with that 100%. >> i think there's a growing trend in kind -- inside of washington to favor intervention in syria, some kind of
.p. and they also have, b.p. has a big deal going with russia right now too, start drilling in antarctica. i think they need to put a stop to that, or at least some regulation and more control on it. and that's my comment. host: don, thanks for the call from new york this morning. here's a chart from the "new york times," talking about the money b.p. has set aside and spent to date to cover the fall out from the 2010 spill. b.p. has set aside about $42 billion to cover cover costs related to the accident. spent about $36.3 billion to date, that includes the $4.5 billion of fines and penalties levied by the government as part of thursday's settlement. about $7.8 billion proposed settlement with other claimments, $9 billion paid out to resolve claims by individuals, businesses and government enities, and $14 billion in operational response and clean up cost. we'll go to dean from grantsburg, wisconsin on the democratic line. dean, thanks for the call. caller: hi. host: go ahead. caller: thanks for taking my call. i just want to say if your guy's program wasn't so good we wouldn't be able to ask such
there. >>> megaphone has made its stock market debut in london. but shares in russia's second lowest mobile operator are trading below $20 a share, the bottom of the anticipated range. the ipo is still the biggest by a russian company since 2010. so, hope you feel fully caught up on your global news now. >>> still to come, southeast asia's economies are coming up roses in the face of global uncertainties. what's driving them and will the momentum last? we'll find out next. >>> welcome back to the program. the bank of thailand has kept rates as expected. the central bank says the economy is this good shape and strong domestic demand will help counter risks from overseas. in the philippines, the governor of the central bank insists its easy policies are confident despite economic growth. it was well above expectations for growth of just 5.3%. for more on southeast asia, joining us now, economist at southeast asia at rbs. my apologies about that. i'm butchering names all morning. >> no problem at all. >> can you talk first at all about thailand in particular. investors look to this as a
, where they were born and raised in russia and they inherited a lot of money and they are actually communists. so all the republican party kind of liens on their side. money is not given away -- some people just give money away or they loan it to you, but if you are going to give money for a republican to win, to buy a governor or a president, there is something you want back. all of these republicans better take in mind that they could be voting for a communist which is a movement coming into our country. the documentary says -- host: where did you see the documentary? caller: national geographic. from noon until 6:00, and half of it was about the koch brothers. but you saw it on the national geographic jenna? larry sabato, any response? guest: i am just on to say this. i never met the koch brothers and i never -- never corresponded with them. i've got news for you. they are not communists. i am pretty sure of that. so, let me just correct the record, and i think we should go on. host: how often do voters split tickets in virginia? guest: a very good question. virginia was once th
have serious and continuing differences with russia -- on syria, missile defense, nato enlargement, a human-rights, and other issues. so we have to take a smart and balanced approach going forward. we need to continue expanding our engagement with russia, but with very clear rise about where we draw our lines. we also have to engage with a set of the emerging democratic powers like brazil and mexico, india and indonesia, south africa and turkey, that are exercising greater influence in their region and on the world stage. the strategic fundamentals of these relationships, shared democratic values, common economic and security priorities, are pushing our interests and do closer convergence. this is reflected in the broad strategic dialogue we have launched with the emerging powers. the key going forward will be to encourage them to leave behind the outdated politics of the past and take up the responsibilities that come with global influence, including defending our shared democratic values beyond their borders. let me turn to the third element of our agenda, what i call economic st
at the consequences for russia, this is not just a regional question. it is about a relationship with another superpower with the u.n. we are very comfortable acting with this, but yet we find people saying that maybe obama should do this for a different reason. so i think it is a really big problem for the administration. it is not tied to the election. it is not even a political type of election. >> let me also say that i agree 100%. don't get me wrong. i don't think that us going in and invading is going to change perceptions. i agree. either way, there will be these perceptions. along with positive it images in the west. helping syria is by no means going to change the perceptions that we have some countries because of some countries versus others. >> i think there is a growing trend inside of washington in favor of intervention. some kind of increased action. i see no such trend in the country in public opinion. i just don't see any real support for it. the bottom line is this is horrible, but the american military intervention there would make things astronomically worse for syria and f
at the consequences for russia, i mean, this is not just a regional question. it is about the relationship with another superpower with the u.n.. really, you know, it's interesting. i'm sure that a good percentage of the people here, when bush acted to go to war in iraq, were very uncomfortable acting, and, yesterday, we find people now saying maybe obama should do it for a different reason so i think it's a really big problem for the administration. it's not due to the electionment eng the election is not going to solve that problem for them. it's not a political -- >> actually -- >> a cautious approach -- >> exactly. >> i agree 100%, don't get me wrong. i don't think we could win; right? us invading is going to change perceptions, i agree, but either way, there's going to be these perceptions along with the perceptions of the positive images of the west. us helping syria is by no means going to change the perceptions that we helped some countries because of resources versus others. i agree with that 1 # 00%. >> i think there is a growing trends inside of washington in favor of some inter
and russia, they have palest havinians udied at the universities there. they have taken the technology home. this is widespread grad rocket -- katyusha rocket technology. >> if this becomes a ground war, i asked ben the same question this changes how? >> it changes in terms of civilian casualties, it is unavoidable if you put that much firepower in there. remember there is still the question here, post arab spring, everybody is looking to see mohamed morsi, turkey, these are muslim brotherhood, if you will, governments. they're looking for them, don, to in one way or another bring hamas under control, to calm us down. nobody wants a full blown conflict. fattah doesn't want it in the west bank. israelis don't want to see it. they're feeling more insecure than they have in years. they understand the current strategy won't hold in the future. >> this man knows his stuff. appreciate it, sir. >>> developing now here in the u.s., two people are missing after an oil platform explodes in the gulf of mexico. the platform about 20 miles off the coast of grand isle, louisiana. it is not a drilling fac
be highly desirable to find a way to bring russia to work out a deal for us to say no, no, no i just want to make the point that as wonderful as all the modern tools are they will not allow us to just tools to consult the situations and i think the moment is here. it is over dewey and extremely urgent to try to find a way that will end the killing and syria not only because of israel and other countries in the region but because it sets a - example to other bad guys in the region and elsewhere who will be encouraged that they can get away with these types of behavior if we don't act so this is a huge challenge we have to face even is not a military solution, it is a smart diplomacy. >> we have to wrap up pretty soon but let me take two more comments from here and there. yes. >> thank you very much. my name is luis. i'm afraid i'm standing in for life defense secretary. i just want to make a point after having had a long period of being a diplomatic practitioner particularly in my part of the world in the china, asia, jakarta, they have some good news which i would like to throw in. there
with this as merit of urgency. russia already making its discomfort known, saying it's worried simply because nato is there in a military capacity. it could get drawn in, and we've seen this before. the turkish military firing back at the syrian regime when they shell into turkish territory. a very volatile situation here, and many observers thinking for once nato has that really sophisticated firepower on the border with syria, the no fly zone may end up emerging simply because it's going to be hard for people to know on the nato side, on the turkish side exactly what syrian regime activity amounts to being hostile or not. frederica. >> nick payton-walsh, thank you so much in beirut. >>> ahead on "newsroom international" anti-government rebels storm a critical city in the democratic republic of congo. now thousands are running from the violence. 's big news. presenting androgel 1.62%. both are used to treat men with low testosterone. androgel 1.62% is from the makers of the number one prescribed testosterone replacement therapy. it raises your testosterone levels, and... is concentrated, so you c
that could drag nato into the war, russia warned. >> translator: as i already said, the main concern is that the more weapons there are, the greater the risk that they will be used. and also any provocation could trigger it. >> reporter: winter will be unkind to the regime and its opponents. more refugees will struggle in freezing temperatures. but worse weather will also make it harder for the regime's main advantage, air power to fly. the hardest month for syrians may still be ahead. joe, i should point out what we've just seen in the report many people most traveling the intense shelling of these damascus suburbs namely there it seems to be that the regime is unable to push into these rebel strongholds there and is resorting to this heavy bombardment. but i'm sure there are people in the inner circle around president bashar al assad perhaps feeling nervous tonight. joe. >> nick paton walsh in beirut. >>> some charities are worried they might need their own lifeline with the country on the brink of a fiscal cliff. that's next. and actually share . ♪ the lexus december to remember
tarpaulin. russia, switzerland and france, experts opened the grave. they didn't actually have to remove the body but removed samples from the body and closed the grave again. all we saw out here was a ceremony, very solemn one, where palestinian leaders laid flowers to commemorate the late palestinian leader yasser arafat. what they're looking for, as you said quite rightly, is a poison. pl plunonium 2010. the palestinians, of course, have long accused israel of poisoning yasser arafat. israelis not willing to comment on that. palestinians say they hope this investigation will get them some clarity. carol? >> fred pleitgen, reporting live from the west bank this morning. >>> chris christie says he's finally able to look beyond the devastation unleashed on his state by superstorm sandy and says the long recovery home has convinced him to run for re-election next year. storm victims have been asking about his plans. >> this weekend, mary pat and i, the kids, had an opportunity to just kind of have a few minutes to ourselves. and we talked about it. and we've decided we're going to seek re
. >> so like an exchange in the old communitiest russia? sort of like that, exactly. exactly. what i think will happen is there will be a secondary market where people will go for goods and services. the merck, board of trade, i.c.e., there's a lot of technology behind it. it's not just the price on the board. there's clearing in settlement, delivery, all the things that go with back office processing that people forget about. that's ongoing fixed costs that's very expensive. i think the -- cme, one of the top technological companies in the united states. it seems like a massive undertaking, so legislations pass, but none of the detail is worked out. you know, when it comes to the fiscal cliff. many have said you can take an envelope, and we need to extend the age, maybe tax issues, these are easy. but what we're talking about to set up would be on the back of the sears tower. it's monstrous. the government isn't good at this. >> the government isn't good at it. but we know the way we were doing it was bad, right? >> absolutely agreed. >> they're focusing there on costs. that's why costs c
the obvious higher priorities, iran, the middle east, syria, north korea, china, russia, and so forth. i would imagine considerably lower priority. >> did cuba policy wax and wean with each new administration? >> it did. it did. the most ferocious opposition was in the kennedy years. jack kennedy, as i said, was really determined to do something about the cuba problem. he was obsessed. hue millñhr -- huh mill -- humiliated by castro in the bay of pigs. kennedy's obsession was vietnam so cuba declined precipitously. presidents like ford, carter, made very serious efforts to achieve that with fidel castro, the opposite of what kennedy was doing, and so, yes, cuba maxed and waned. a different kind of priority over the 50 years for 10 or 11 american presidents. >> on the reverse side, does cuba have good assets? did cuba have good assets in the u.s.? has the castro regime tried to assassinate a u.s. president? >> i don't think castro ever had a direct hand in an assassination plot against an american president, but i describe in the book some of the most startling information i acquired from cuba
architect the region -- we brought in china, india, russia. i'm not the prime minister and the secretary of state would have go two or three times a year. we articulated we're going main tape the force level. we got off to a good start, but i can only say that we partially succeeded in the elevating the asia. the dynamism of the economy it was not as clear as it is today. and partly because the secretary of the president kept getting dragged back in to other issues. you asked about president's view. he thought asia was important. he was obviously an economic animal and realized the important of the trade and so on. but the first [inaudible] focused on the domestic economy which, by the way, a single most important thing you can do for the foreign policy. above all today. so and christopher spent a lot of time in asia went out secretary christopher to the region but he often would get -- bosnia crisis, we had somalia and haiti and other crisis and the middle east, and a lot we raised property file, indon't think we were able to succeed as certainly kurt succeeded with the great admiration
at the expenditures and the resources by china, by russia, by others -- >> uh-huh.. >> -- and what for them is one of their biggest concerns? well, it's the u.s. and not only national security secrets, but increasingly commercial secrets. much of that which can be gleaned or stolen from cyberspace. and it's a dire threat. and i think that in part because so much of our intention, so much of our resources were spent in the counterterrorism arena, we've forgotten the necessity of old-fashioned counterintelligence. and that's an important element of this. a big one. >> often i've heard some people have been involved in counterintelligence say it tends to be seen as a little bit of the red-headed stepchild in the intelligence world. >> uh-huh. >> why is it that when we need it, and what's the cure for it? >> i think in part because it's something we don't want to think about. it's very unpleasant to think that our agencies or our businesses have been penetrated by a foreign power, by a criminal organization, and we'd rather think about, well, how do we achieve that goal, a foreign policy goal or a pro
keep us reliant on foreign oil from -- let's just list the countries, madam president -- russia, venezuela, iraq, saudi arabia. i mentioned iran. it's poorly drafted and damaging to our security. instead, we have got an opportunity today to help our military and our country. this is how we move forward. this isn't about an environmental agenda or some kind of a green conspiracy. it's about doing the right thing, supporting our military brass and establishing a stronger national security and energy security posture in the years ahead. i urge my colleagues to support my amendment to strike section 313. mr. president, as i conclude, i would ask for unanimous consent that senators gillibrand and tom udall be added to my amendment, number 2985 to s. 3254. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. udall: thank you, mr. president. i would yield the floor to my colleague from oklahoma. mr. inhofe: it's my understanding the senator has a timing thing which he would like to have five minutes before my time begins. that's acceptable. first i would look to ask unanimous consent that cap
considerably. as you can see, there is a lot of over russia there in recent years. i also want to focus on the total number of political appointees and appointments available to each president. these are the main categories. presidential appointment with consent at the set, about 800 people, they are at the top of the executive branch, these are constitutionally established offices of the united states. each one of them is created by a congressional statute. non-career senior executive service. it has about 8000 career people, but 10% of those means nonpolitical appointees. it is a bridge gaps between the top-level executive and the next layer is of mid-level management. the next category are level 1- 15, it means general schedule. these were created in 1953. republicans were so starved of getting offices, eisenhower did not approve of patronage and did not want anything to do with a, but the pressure from the republican party was so great that they brought patronage into the white house and created in schedules c positions lower at the bureaucracy. at that time, there were about 200 of
will work today on a measure to normalize u.s. trade relations with russia. you can see that debate starting at noon eastern over on c-span. now live to the senate floor here on c-span2. the presiding officer: the senate will come to order. the chaplain, dr. barry black, will lead the senate in prayer. the chaplain: let us pray. eternal lord god, today let your favor rest upon the members of our government's legislative branch. establish the works of their hands and strengthen them to honor you by serving others. let your life-giving spirit move them to feel greater compassion for those in need. use them to remove barriers that divide us, may they strive to be agents of healing and hope, as they help us all live in greater justice and peace. we pray in your holy name. amen. the presiding officer: please join me in reciting the pledge of allegiance to the flag. i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america, and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the presiding officer: the clerk will read a communication
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